Ropes | Do It Yourself | UFA Co-operative Ltd.

UFA offers a wide variety of rope which can make it difficult to find the perfect one for the job. All of the ropes that we offer have unique strengths and weaknesses based on their material, construction, and other characteristics. To help you decide which rope is the best suited to your needs, we have put together this guide that will simplify the process and help you take home a rope that will get the job done.

ROPE TYPE OVERVIEW

NATURAL VS. SYNTHETIC CONSTRUCTION & SAFE WORKING LOAD

ROPE PROPERTIES & APPLICATIONS

ROPE CONSTRUCTION

Material Type Cotton Jute Nylon Polyester Poly­propylene Sisal
Fiber Construct­ion Natural Natural Synthetic Synthetic Synthetic Natural
Applicat­ions Kitchen, Workshop, General household Gardening, General household Mooring, Marine, Tie downs Camping, General household Marine, Industrial Gardening, General household
Other Points to Consider
  • Limited chemical and mold protection
  • Low stretch
  • Soft fibre
  • Strongest rope type
  • Lasts longer than natural rope
  • Humidity and mold resistant
  • Better UV ray protection than nylon
  • Light weight (floats)
  • Eco­nomical
  • Humidity and mold resistant
  • Limited chemical and mold protection
Bio­degrade­able Checked Checked Checked
Shock Resistant Checked Checked Checked
Abrasion Resistant Checked Checked
Chemical Resistant Checked Checked Checked Checked
UV Ray Protection Checked Checked Checked
Natural Synthetic
Constructed from cotton, sisal, and hemp fibres. Does not melt through heat exposure, but will shrink when wet. Designed for lightweight applications such as packaging. Ideal for tying and knotting. Natural ropes are all biodegradable with no chemical by-product. Typically constructed of materials such as nylon, polyester, and polypropylene. Has a 30 percent longer lifespan than natural rope. Higher resistance to water, mildew, and UV rays. Higher tensile strength than natural ropes. Does not shrink when wet, but heat may cause the rope to melt.

What is Safe Working Load?

The safe working load of a rope is the maximum working load designated by the manufacturer. It represents a load that is less than the minimum load that would make a rope fail or break to ensure the user's safety when using the product. It is calculated by dividing the load at which the rope would fail by a certain safety factor specified by the manufacturer.

*Please see the specifications of each rope product for its safe working load.

Cotton Rope

Cotton Rope

Made of natural fibres with medium strength. Often used in twines and small cords. It is soft, pliable, and easy on the hands.

Pros: Biodegradable. UV ray protection. Low stretch.

Cons: Lower strength than certain natural fibre ropes like manilla.

Common Uses: Home décor, crafting, temporary outdoor use.

Jute Rope

Jute Rope

A soft, natural fibre that is usually made into yarns, twines, and small rope.

Pros: Biodegradable. Soft fibre. Shock resistant.

Cons: Low in strength.

Common Uses: Crafting, décor, gardening.

Nylon Rope

Nylon Rope

A synthetic fibre with a very high strength to weight ratio. It is abrasion resistant and has excellent shock absorbing capabilities. It will absorb water which causes the rope to shrink and lose some of its strength. The water will not cause the rope fibres to rot.

Pros: Biodegradable. Soft fibre. Shock resistant.

Cons: Low in strength.

Common Uses: Crafting, décor, gardening.

Polyester Rope

Polyester Rope

A synthetic rope with low stretch characteristics and resists abrasion. It has a slightly lower strength to weight ratio than nylon. It does not absorb water so it will not shrink or rot. Excellent UV resistance makes it popular for extended outdoor use.

Pros: Humidity and chemical resistant. Abrasion resistant. UV Protection.

Cons: Lower strength to weight ratio than nylon.

Common Uses: Extended outdoor use, tents, clotheslines.

Polypropylene Rope

Polypropylene Rope

This light weight, synthetic material floats, does not absorb water, and will not rot. UV protection has been added to prevent deterioration. Relative to other synthetic ropes it is poor at holding knots and has limited abrasion resistance.

Pros: Light weight (floats). Stronger than natural fibre ropes. Resistant to humidity, water, and mold.

Cons: Lower strength to weight ratio than nylon.

Common Uses: Extended outdoor use, tents, clotheslines.

Sisal Rope

Sisal Rope

Sisal is a hard, natural fibre. It is resistant to salt water and is often used in twine and small rope.

Pros: Humidity and chemical resistant. Abrasion resistant. UV Protection.

Cons: Lower strength to weight ratio than nylon.

Common Uses: Extended outdoor use, tents, clotheslines.

Diamond Braid

Diamond Braid

Strands braided in over and under patterns for good strength and an attractive finish. Made with a core, it holds knots extremely well and is easy to handle.

Double Braid

Double Braid

A second diamond braid rope is braided over a smaller diamond braid rope. The construction resists shock and does not flatten over pulleys.

Elastic

Elastic

Rubber elastic center makes the rope extremely flexible.

Hollow Core

Hollow Core

Braided rope without a core which makes it light weight with the ability to float. It is easy to splice.

Solid Braid

Solid Braid

Strands are braided in a lock-stitch pattern to make a durable rope that runs smoothly over pulleys. It has low stretch and an attractive finish.

Twisted

Twisted

Simple construction where strands are twisted together. It offers good strength and is easy to splice but tends to rotate under strain.